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Relationship between maternal anthropometry and birth weight in a Sri Lankan cohort of term neonates

Authors:

Damitha Asanga Gunawardane ,

University of Adelaide, AU
About Damitha Asanga
School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences
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Samath D. Dharmaratne,

University of Peradeniya, LK
About Samath D.
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine
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Dhammica. S. Rowel

Ministry of Health, LK
About Dhammica. S.
National Programme Manager, Intranatal and Newborn Care Unit, Family Health Bureau
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Abstract

Background: Birth weight (BW) of new born babies is the main proxy measure used by the healthcare providers and planners to measure foetal wellbeing. Further, it is strongly associated with the babies’ risk of mortality, and health later in life. Among many other factors, maternal anthropometry plays a crucial role in determining the neonatal BW.

 

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of maternal pre-pregnancy weight, height, Body Mass Index (BMI), Gestational Weight Gain (GWG) and neonatal BW in a cohort of Sri Lankanterm neonates.

 

Methods: This is a correlation study based on the data reported in a prospective study done at Teaching Hospital (TH) Kandy, to explore the neonatal outcomes at term. The study included 688 mother-newborn pairs with term neonates delivered at TH Kandy between February and May 2017.

 

Results: In the correlation testing between maternal anthropometric measurements and neonatal BW,all maternal anthropometric measurements considered in the study had significant positive correlation with neonatal birth weight (P<0.001). The strength of association between maternal anthropometry and birth weight was higher in baby girls compared to baby boys. In multiple linear regression,  maternalprepregnancy weight, maternal height and GWGhad significant associations with neonatal birth weight (p<0.001). According to the standardized regression coefficients, pre-pregnancy weight had the greatest impact on BW of term neonates, followed by the GWG.

 

Conclusion: Maternal prepregnancy weight, maternal height, maternal BMI and GWG were significantly associated with neonatal birth weight at term. However, maternal prepregnancy weight was the best predictor of term neonatal BW in Sri Lanka.
How to Cite: Gunawardane, D.A., Dharmaratne, S.D. and Rowel, D.S., 2017. Relationship between maternal anthropometry and birth weight in a Sri Lankan cohort of term neonates. Sri Lanka Journal of Medicine, 26(2), pp.4–12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/sljm.v26i2.35
Published on 28 Dec 2017.
Peer Reviewed

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